How “Babies” (2010 Documentary) Reminds Us How Precious the Human Experience Can Be

I recently watched the 2010 documentary Babies and thought I would share my feedback. This film documents the amazing journey of the first year for 4 babies in 4 different corners of the world: from Mongolia to Namibia to San Francisco to Tokyo. We see these babies come into the world and how they experience their world as they grow and develop into toddlers.

The film has almost no dialogue, yet it tells a rich and powerful story about how we are all connected no matter how diverse our global community may be. While watching, I felt as if I was seeing the world through the eyes of a newborn developing into an infant, then a crawler, and then taking their first steps. I was reminded how precious the experience of birth and development is…if you have not seen it, you really must!

World Breastfeeding Week Celebrated Around The Globe August 1-7

WBW 2010 LogoBreastfeeding mothers and advocates everywhere have a reason to celebrate next week: August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week!

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA), and breastfeeding advocates in more than 170 countries worldwide will be celebrating World Breastfeeding Week for the 19th year with the theme “Breastfeeding: Just 10 Steps. The Baby-Friendly Way”.

Research shows that the best feeding option globally is the initiation of breastfeeding within the first half hour of life, exclusive breastfeeding for a full six months and continued breastfeeding through the second year or beyond.

UNICEF recently noted that the reduction of child deaths from 13 million globally in 1990 to 8.8 million in 2008 is partly due to the adoption of basic health interventions such as early and exclusive breastfeeding.

About The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) is a global network of individuals and organisations concerned with the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding worldwide based on the Innocenti Declarations, the Ten Links for Nurturing the Future and the WHO/UNICEF Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding.

Its core partners are International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), La Leche League International (LLLI), International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA), Wellstart International and Academy of Breastfeeding
Medicine (ABM).

Websites: www.worldbreastfeedingweek.org and www.waba.org.my

Sage Diaper, Our Newest Member of the Baby’s Organic Nursery Family Coming Soon

After more than 25 years in the cloth diapering business, we are going to be bringing something new and exciting to the Baby’s Organic Nursery Family. This summer, we will be launching several new products under the name: Sage Diaper. We believe it will offer the wisest way to cover your baby’s bottom.

We pride ourselves on offering knowledge and experience that will be helpful to new parents as they make their choices and work their way into parenthood. And, even though there is an overtone of seriousness involved, it is also possible to have some fun with this approach and avoid being too serious or pompous in our “Sageness”.

Cloth diapers have come a long ways since Rachael introduced her patented pinless cloth diapering system (Diaperaps) to American families more than 25 years ago. Our new products are the fruits of a year of intensive research, labor and testing in fabrication and design.

Rachael’s goal in developing this line was Simplicity, Flexibility and Reliability

We’ll be launching our Sage Diaper line soon and will offer all our Blog Readers a special one week only 10% discount.  So check back soon for details!

Childhood Is Not for Sale: Support Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood

Campaign for a Commercial Free ChildhoodCCFC

Part of our approach to holistic and organic baby care is bringing attention to some of the many organizations that exemplify our values by working to make the life of your baby and child healthier and happier. In the past, we have highlighted groups such as Healthy Child Healthy World- and now we want to spotlight the Campaign for a Commerical-Free Childhood.

Why?  We believe that babies are born with senses that have not been tainted or tarnished by the world…but our children are becoming increasingly exposed and influenced by a marketing-driven media culture that is more interested in profit than what is best for a baby or young child.

Children in our society should not be viewed as merely a “target market”.  This practice is linked to an increase in conditions like childhood obesity, materialism, and an  overall decrease in imagination and creative play (to name a few).  The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood wants to fight this by reclaiming childhood from corporate marketers and to limit the impact of commercial culture on children.

From CCFC:

When children adopt the values that dominate commercial culture—dependence on the things we buy for life satisfaction, a “me first” attitude, conformity, impulse buying, and unthinking brand loyalty—the health of democracy and sustainability of our planet are threatened. CCFC works for the rights of children to grow up—and the freedom for parents to raise them—without being undermined by commercial interests.

This organization worked with the Federal Trade Commission to hold Disney accountable for their claim that the that Baby Einstein Video Series were educational for infants.  There is no evidence that this is true- in fact the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend no TV or movies until a child is 2.  They succeeded in not only requiring that Disney stop advertising this claim, but required the company to compensate parents who purchased them.

Please visit their Website to learn more about this initiative and how you can support them!

Protect Your Family From Toxic Plastics

Protect Your Family:
http://www.breastcancerfund.org/reduce-your-risk/tips/protect-your-family/
Keep an eye out for the bad stuff lurking in everyday household items and learn how to make healthier choices. By making a few simple changes, you can significantly reduce your family’s exposure to toxic chemicals.
Know Your Plastics
Plastics are purely manmade, which means lots of chemicals. But some are safer than others. Avoid plastics that contain hormone-disrupting phthalates, especially polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which often has the recycling code 3. The other thing to look out for is toxic BPA, found in clear, shatterproof plastic and sometimes labeled with the recycling code 7.
CLEAR SCIENCE
What’s behind the recycling codes on plastic? Learn which numbers are associated with breast cancer risk.
Science overview of plastics chemicals >
Keep Plastic Out of the Microwave
Even so-called “microwave safe” plastic can leach chemicals into your food when it gets hot, so choose glass or ceramic containers for re-heating food. Don’t cover your food with plastic wrap when you heat it, either; use a ceramic plate or an unbleached paper towel or napkin.
Cook with Stainless Steel or Cast Iron Pans
Consider alternatives to aluminum pans and utensils, especially those that are older. Anodizing prevents the aluminum from leaching into food, so newer, anodized aluminum cookware is considerably safer. But your best bet is stainless steel or cast iron.
Metals linked to breast cancer risk
Avoid Non-stick Cooking Surfaces
Although there’s no denying they make our life easier, non-stick pans contain toxic polyfluorinated chemicals that can be released at high temperatures. While we don’t yet know exactly what the risks are, this is another good argument for switching to stainless steel or cast iron.
Avoid Bottled Water when Possible
Go for the tap (or the filtered tap). Single-use containers may contain phthalates, and the big commercial water jugs may contain toxic BPA. Use a real glass for drinking at home, and pick up a reusable stainless-steel water bottle for drinks on the go. (It’s also better for the environment!)
Choose BPA-free Baby Bottles and Plastic Cups
Glass bottles are always a good option. And with the increased awareness of the risks of BPA, it’s easy to find baby bottles and sippy cups that are made from safer plastics. Look for BPA-free alternatives, now available in most stores that carry baby bottles. If you don’t see them, ask.
Toss Old, Soft Plastic Toys
Some soft plastic toys made before a ban that took effect in February 2009 contained harmful plastic softeners called phthalates. Since these items frequently end up in children’s mouths you should toss older plastics items and say no to hand-me-downs.
RSS
Related Blog PostsAbout the Breast Cancer Fund

Our mission at Baby’s Organic Nursery is to share tips and raise awareness so families everywhere can see how easy it really is to create a safer and healthier environment for our babies.  Whenever I come across helpful tips such as the ones posted below from the The Breast Cancer Fund, I try to share with our readers.

The more we can have an open conversation about potentially harmful ingredients like Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC),  Phthalates or Bisphenol A (aka BPA) found in our children’s utensils, toys and more- the more we power we will have to make lasting change that could protect the our quality of life and ultimately save lives.   I hope these tips are helpful to you and please share  your thoughts and ideas with us as well!

Be sure to see the full article, Protect Your Family on their site:

SAY NO TO PLASTICS WITH RECYCLING CODE 3 & 7 Avoid plastics that contain hormone-disrupting phthalates, especially polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which often has the recycling code 3.  The other thing to look out for is toxic BPA, found in clear, shatterproof plastic and sometimes labeled with the recycling code 7.

KEEP PLASTIC OUT OF THE MICROWAVE Even so-called “microwave safe” plastic can leach chemicals into your food when it gets hot, so choose glass or ceramic containers for re-heating food. Don’t cover your food with plastic wrap when you heat it, either; use a ceramic plate or an unbleached paper towel or napkin.

AVOID BOTTLED WATER Go for the tap (or the filtered tap). Single-use containers may contain phthalates, and the big commercial water jugs may contain toxic BPA. Use a real glass for drinking at home, and pick up a reusable stainless-steel water bottle for drinks on the go. (It’s also better for the environment!)

USE BPA-FREE BOTTLES & PLASTIC CUPS Glass bottles are always a good option. And with the increased awareness of the risks of BPA, it’s easy to find baby bottles and sippy cups that are made from safer plastics. Look for BPA-free alternatives, now available in most stores that carry baby bottles. If you don’t see them, ask.

TOSS OLD, SOFT PLASTIC TOYS  Some soft plastic toys made before a ban that took effect in February 2009 contained harmful plastic softeners called phthalates. Since these items frequently end up in children’s mouths you should toss older plastics items and say no to hand-me-downs.

About the Breast Cancer Fund: I am highlighting the Breast Cancer Fund because I admire their goal to transform how our society thinks about and uses chemicals and radiation.  Their mission is to protect our health and reduce breast cancer risk so that our children, grandchildren and planet can thrive. Our Mission: In response to the public health crisis of breast cancer, the Breast Cancer Fund identifies — and advocates for elimination of — the environmental and other preventable causes of the disease.

Choosing Non-Toxic Products Paves the Way for a More Sustainable Future for Family Life

There are non-toxic and sustainable choices available for children.   In 2009, the Danish Government  unveiled official research demonstrating that

….Two-year old children are at risk from a bewildering array of gender-bending chemicals in everyday items such as waterproof clothes, rubber boots, bed linens, food, nappies (disposable diapers), sunscreen lotion and moisturizing cream.

This gender bending phenomenon has been evident for years.  Disposable diapers are made of plastics and processed wood pulp. Almost all disposable diapers also contain super-absorbent polymers, aka SAP’s. These are chemical compounds which are placed inside disposable diapers in the form of beads, which turn into a gel when exposed to urine.

Are the chemicals used in disposable diapers safe for babies? What does it mean if a specific chemical is deemed ‘safe”, when, as the Danish study confirmed, our children are exposed to a “bewildering array” of chemicals, and no one knows how these interact over time to weaken immune systems, increase childhood cancer and diabetes, lower sperm counts and bring about other adverse reactions seen by doctors and parents all over the world.

There are certain aspects of our world, and of our children’s world, that we can exercise control over, and others about which we can do little or nothing. The immediate environment of our families is an area over which we can exercise a great deal of control.

The fact is there are plenty of effective reusable diapering choices available that do not include SAP’s, processed wood pulp or other chemical components. There are chemical free lotions, organic clothing and bedding, and other products that are more in line with a non-toxic and sustainable approach to child rearing and family life. And when we make the choice to go down this path, we have a “multiplier effect” that increases the impact of our choices on the global environment.

If we support products, companies and industries that are working to create and distribute these products, we make it more likely that others will as well. This is certainly what has happened with Organic Agriculture, which has grown from a “fringe”, counter-culture approach to a global force representing an alternative to GMO’s, chemical agriculture and factory farming.

Ghandi said that “we must become the change we wish to see in the world”. If we want to live in a world where sustainability and environmental safety are important values, we begin by incorporating them into our own lives. Diapers and diaper care is the beginning of a new life and a new phase in the life of our family. The decision to diaper with reusable, chemical free products is a great way to start this process. Because, in the immortal words of Pooh, “Let’s begin at the beginning.”

Lights Off: Don’t Forget Earth Hour 2010 this Weekend!

Something very exciting is happening this weekend.  On Saturday, March 27- millions  around the world are going to make a bold statement to show our concern for climate change by simply turning off our lights from 8:30-9:30pm in our local time zones.   Earth Hour 2009 got a lot of attention from the media and world leaders as you can see from this video- and we need to continue to send a message to preserve our beautiful planet for future generations.  Please help by spreading the word!  Remind your friends and neighbors to participate!

The Holistic Moms Network Reminds Us that Nursing is Normal

The general consensus among the health community (most pediatricians, The World Health Organization, and the CDC just to name a few) is the benefits of breastfeeding your baby are clear and widely supported in the scientific literature.

Despite this, the Australian media recently reported that young women are reluctant to breastfeed their babies due to fear of public embarrassment. Upon hearing this, members of The Holistic Moms Network, a non-profit organization, launched an initiative encouraging mothers to share photos of themselves breastfeeding in public locations all over the world.

The result is this empowering Nursing Our Future video featured on the organization’s website:


Please help make our culture more accepting of breastfeeding and help mothers find the support and encouragement they need to continue by sharing this video.

List of Resources Provided by HMN

Preparing to Breastfeed

Breastfeeding: Getting Started

Breastfeeding Information and Support

Nursing: It’s More Than Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding Links

How Does Your State Rank on Breastfeeding Support?